The World’s Smallest Cow

Say hello to the Vechoor cow (it’s not difficult: there’s probably one grazing outside your cottage). While a regular cow gives 15 liters of milk a day, the Vechoor gives only 2 – 3 liters . Not good for popularity if you’re a cow. The result: these once prolific animals were crossbred to near extinction.

 

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A major conservation effort ensued, where we joined hands with the local agricultural college. Today there are plenty of Vechoors about, adding to Coconut Lagoon’s air of general contentment. 

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Meet The Darter

Coconut Lagoon abounds in birds (more than 90, the last time we checked). But mention must be made of the Darter, one of the Vembanad’s friendliest denizens. Darter numbers had fallen to as low as 75, but thanks to conservation efforts, lots of them can be spotted all over the lake, drying their wings somewhat comically in the sun.

The Weekly Village Clean-Up
As part of the local community, we take it upon ourselves to clear the neighbouring village of accumulated garbage, every other week..
The team gets gloved and kitted up for an early start.
The Coconut Lagoon team on its way. Usually, 7-8 of us volunteer for the task each time..
Plastics are bagged separately for recycling And bottles may find their way into our bottle wall (see gallery below)..
Heavy objects, rusted metal and so forth, are gathered in another large bag..
Finally, organic waste, pre-separated, is used on the compost heaps back in the resort, where the earthworms turn it into fertiliser..


Nurturing Nature

Coconut husks make fine planters, and keep the goats away

Coconut husks make fine planters, and keep the goats away

The experimental solar powered boat

The experimental solar powered boat

The biomass digester. Turning garden and kitchen waste to rich soil

The biomass digester. Turning garden and kitchen waste to rich soil

"India’s largest butterfly, the Southern birdwing, with a grand wingspan of 25-30 cm is a common visitor to Coconut Lagoon , thanks to the presence of its larval host plant, Aristolochea indica. But don't miss the smallest: the Grass jewel, whose wing span is only a half cm.